Candids Challenge Tips

Photograph your subject when they’re not aware of it and you can create intimate, expressive portraits. Here are some tips.

Include Surroundings

When taking candid portraits, don’t leave out the background. The location can give context and meaning to your subject and help explain who they are.

Photograph by @Linsey

Photograph by @Linsey

Shoot from the Hip

Taking shots without raising your camera may help you get more natural photographs. With digital cameras, it’s easy to take pictures from an unassuming angle that will capture the moment. Allow the camera to fade into the background to help your subject relax and be more spontaneous. Remember: don’t be creepy. Ask permission first.

Photograph by @Lauryn

Photograph by @Lauryn

Take More than One

Even if your subject knows you’re taking their picture, you can catch them at a candid moment if you shoot several photos in a row to catch the action. Then choose the best one from your camera roll. One way to do this: Ask your subject to jump in the air, dance, laugh—anything with action—and then take a series of pictures using your camera’s burst mode.

Photograph by @Kalani

Photograph by @Kalani

Be a Part of the Action

When you take a lot of photographs, friends will soon forget about the camera. Talk with your friends; then step aside to take your image while the conversation continues. Make visible the interaction you’ve been a part of.

Commencement Ceremony, Crossroads School, Santa Monica, 1992, Lauren Greenfield. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Allison Amon & Lisa Mehling. © Lauren Greenfield/INSTITUTE

Commencement Ceremony, Crossroads School, Santa Monica, 1992, Lauren Greenfield. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Allison Amon & Lisa Mehling. © Lauren Greenfield/INSTITUTE

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